tunein

Sun Valley Serenade, with Glenn Miller Orchestra


Sun Valley Serenade is a 1941 musical film starring Sonja Henie, John Payne, Glenn Miller, Milton Berle, and Lynn Bari. It features the Glenn Miller Orchestra as well as dancing by the Nicholas Brothers and Dorothy Dandridge, performing "Chattanooga Choo Choo", which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1996, and was awarded the first Gold Record for sales of 1.2 million. WIKIPEDIA

Lester Raymond "Les" Brown (March 14, 1912 – January 4, 2001) was an American jazz musician who led the big band Les Brown and His Band of Renown for nearly seven decades from 1938–2000. 

WIKIPEDIA

VIDEO: Les Brown Orchestra - 1984 with Jo AnnJo Greer, Butch Stone and Stumpy Brown and the incredible drumming of Jack Sperling.

 

Les and Larry Elgart

In the mid-1940s, Les and Larry started up their own ensemble, hiring Nelson Riddle, Bill Finegan and Ralph Flanagan to arrange tunes for them. Their ensemble was not successful, and after a few years, they scuttled the band and sold the arrangements they had commissioned to Tommy Dorsey. Both returned to sideman positions in various orchestras. In 1953, Larry met Charles Albertine and recorded two of his experimental compositions, "Impressions of Outer Space" and "Music for Barefoot Ballerinas". Released on 10" vinyl, these recordings became collector's items for fans of avant-garde jazz, but they were not commercially successful at the time. Larry and Albertine put together a more traditional ensemble and began recording them using precise microphone placements, producing what came to be known as the "Elgart sound". This proved to be very commercially successful, and Larry enjoyed a run of successful albums and singles in the 1950s. In 1954, the Elgarts left their permanent mark on music history in recording Albertine's "Bandstand Boogie," which became the theme for the popular TV series "Bandstand" on ABC-TV. Variations of the original surfaced as the show's theme in later years. Les and Larry reunited in 1963, but it would not last long. Les moved to Texas and performed for the rest of his life with The Les Elgart Orchestra while Larry continued to perform and record regularly for decades....WIKIPEDIA

VIDEO:  Les and Larry Elgart Orchestra Chicago 1965...

Larry Elgart, Who Kept Swing Up to Date, Dies at 95

Lawrence Joseph "Larry" Elgart (March 20, 1922 – August 29, 2017) was an American jazz bandleader. With his brother Les, he recorded "Bandstand Boogie", the theme later used for the long-running TV dance show American Bandstand. Elgart was born in 1922 in New London, Connecticut, four years younger than his brother, Les. Their mother was a concert pianist; their father played piano as well, though not professionally. Both brothers began playing in jazz ensembles in their teens, and while young Larry played with jazz musicians such as Charlie Spivak, Woody Herman, Red Norvo, Freddie Slack and Tommy Dorsey. In the mid-1940s, Les and Larry started up their own ensemble, hiring Nelson Riddle, Bill Finegan and Ralph Flanagan to arrange tunes for them. Their ensemble was not successful, and after a few years, they scuttled the band and sold the arrangements they had commissioned to Tommy Dorsey. Both returned to sideman positions in various orchestras.

RIP Bea Wain, One of the Last of the Ladies Who Sang With the big bands

Bea Wain (born Beatrice Weinsier; April 30, 1917 – August 19, 2017) was an American Big Band-era singer born in the Bronx, New York City. She had a number of hits with Larry Clinton and his Orchestra. After her marriage she and her husband, AndrĂ© Baruch, [photo] became involved in radio. She led the vocal group Bea and the Bachelors (with Al Rinker, Ken Lane, and John Smedberg) and the V8 (seven boys and a girl) on the Fred Waring show. In 1937, Wain joined former Tommy Dorsey arranger Larry Clinton and His Orchestra, which she joined after doing chorus work with Fred Waring and Ted Straeter. Her debut with Clinton was made in the summer of 1938 at the Glen Island Casino, New York. She was featured with Clinton on a number of hit tunes, including "Martha" and "Heart and Soul". In 1939, she was voted the most popular female band vocalist in Billboard annual college poll, and that same year she began her solo career. Her first theater tour as a solo led to her being signed for the Your Hit Parade and RCA Victor records.

  WIKIPEDIA VIDEO: With Larry Clinton Orchestra...

Harry Prime, 97, a big band vocalist of the 1940s and 1950s

Harry Prime (born March 5, 1920, died June 15, 2017 was a Big Band vocalist who performed from the late forties through the mid-fifties. Prime was a featured vocalist with the orchestras of Randy Brooks, Tommy Dorsey, Jack Fina and Ralph Flanagan. Prime recorded nearly 100 songs in the '40s and '50s, including "Until," a million-seller with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. "Until" peaked at number four in the US charts.

Louis I. "Buddy" Bregman (July 9, 1930 – January 8, 2017) was an American big band musician

"Buddy" Bregman was an American big band leader, arranger, producer, and composer. He worked with many of the greatest musical artists of 20th Century popular music, including: Ella Fitzgerald, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Louis Armstrong, Sammy Davis Jr., Peggy Lee, Bobby Darin, Anita O'Day, Frank Sinatra, Count Basie, Oscar Peterson, Jerry Lewis, Paul Anka, Buddy Rich, Eddie Fisher, Annie Ross, and Carmen McRae. He became Ethel Merman's personal arranger. Bregman arranged and conducted on albums for Toni Harper, Jane Powell, and Ricky Nelson, plus various tracks for his friend Fred Astaire – including several of Astaire's own songs. Bregman arranged and conducted tracks such as Let There Be Love (Trend Records) for Bobby Shaw, and The Wayward Wind (Era Records) for Gogi Grant. In addition, he produced a selection of his own instrumental albums, such as The Gershwin Anniversary Album, Funny Face & Other Gershwin Tunes, Swinging Kicks, Swingin' Standards, Dig Buddy in Hi-Fi, Symphony of the Golden West, Anita O'Day – Rules of the Road, and That Swing. Following his tenure at Verve Records he became the musical director on NBC's The Eddie Fisher Show, before featuring in his own show, Buddy Bregman's Music Shop. WIKIPEDIA
VIDEO: Bregman with Anita O'Day in concert...

Kay Starr, Big Band and POP Singer With Crossover Appeal, Dies at 94



Katherine Laverne Starks (July 21, 1922 – November 3, 2016), known as Kay Starr, was an American pop and jazz singer who enjoyed considerable success in the 1940s and 1950s. At 15, she was chosen to sing with the Joe Venuti orchestra. Venuti had a contract to play in the Peabody Hotel in Memphis which called for his band to feature a girl singer, a performer he did not have at the time. Venuti's road manager heard Starr on the radio and recommended her to his boss although she was still in junior high school and her parents insisted on a midnight curfew. Though she had brief stints in 1939 with Bob Crosby and Glenn Miller (who hired her in July of that year when his regular singer, Marion Hutton, was sick), Starr spent most of the next few years with Venuti until he dissolved his band in 1942. It was, however, with Miller that she cut her first two recordings: "Baby Me" and "Love with a Capital You". They were not a great success, in part because the band played in a key that, while appropriate for Marion Hutton, did not suit Kay's vocal range. After finishing high school, she moved to Los Angeles and signed with Wingy Manone's band; then from 1943 to 1945 she sang with Charlie Barnet's ensemble, retiring for a year after contracting pneumonia and later developing nodes on her vocal cords as a result of fatigue and overwork. A singer ... is no more than an actor set to music. In 1946 Starr became a soloist, and in 1947 signed a contract with Capitol Records. She is best remembered for introducing two songs that became #1 hits in the 1950s, "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Rock And Roll Waltz". Starr was successful in every field of music she tried: jazz, pop and country. But her roots were in jazz; and Billie Holiday, considered by many the greatest jazz singer of all time, called Starr "the only white woman who could sing the blues." WIKIPEDIA

VIDEO: "I CAN'T GET STARTED" Charlie Barnet and His Orch. vocal:Kay Star "For The Record" V Disc recording session, September 11, 1944 Peanuts Holland, Lyman Vunk, John Martel, Jack Mootz(tp) Gerald Foster, Dave Hallet, Burt Johnson, Skip Morr(tb) Charlie Barnet(ss/as/ts)
 

Pete Fountain, clarinetist 1930 - 2016


Pete Fountain, New Orleans jazz clarinetist who appeared on “The Lawrence Welk Show” and “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson,” has died. He was 86. Fountain died of heart failure on Saturday, 8 August 2016, in New Orleans, his son-in-law and manager Benny Harrell confirmed to the AP. 
VARIETY 



Pierre Dewey LaFontaine, Jr. (July 3, 1930 – August 6, 2016), known professionally as Pete Fountain, was an American clarinetist based in New Orleans, Louisiana. He played easy listening, jazz, Dixieland, pop jazz, honky-tonk jazz, pop, and Creole music. WIKIPEDIA

VIDEO: Pete Fountain - Crazy